Lifelogging and The Quantified Self

Lifelogging is the process of tracking personal data generated by our own behavioral activities. While Lifestreaming primarily tracks the activity of content we create and discover, Lifelogging tracks personal behavior data like exercising, sleeping, and eating.

The Quantified Self movement takes the aspect of simply tracking the raw data to try and draw correlations and ways to improve our lives from it. This movement is a collaboration of users and tool makers who share an interest in self knowledge through self-tracking.
lifelogging

Lifelogging is the practice of gathering personal data about oneself using computers, which can include everything from taking daily self-portraits, constant heart monitoring, or breaking the details of one’s daily existence into graphs and statistics. Out of health concern or curiosity, much of the practice is focused on the body.

Perhaps the most interesting consequences of the self-tracking movement will come when its adherents merge their findings into databases. It can produce powerful medical insights. Patient groups formed around specific diseases have been among the first to recognize the benefits to be derived from aggregating such information and sharing it.

With these devices, people could take far more responsibility for monitoring their own health.

Some of the most interesting tools are those that give us the chance to reflect on who we are. The problems self-tracking tries to solve are important to everyone’s life: How to eat, how to sleep, how to learn, how to work, how to be happy.

Summing-up: Lifelogging has the potential to be a great self-improvement tool as long as we commit to it and track the daily progress in our work or private life. We can analyze how we spend our time, and see what changes we need to make to our lifestyle.

These notes have been taken from:

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